HOW TO CREATE A FAUX DOUBLE EXPOSURE IN 4 STEPS

Article by Lauren Valentine

Article by Lauren Valentine

Found a great article on how easy it is to create double exposure images. Read below...Have you ever spotted those cool, hipster-y double exposure images on a blog or Instagram and longed for one of your own? While you might not have a film camera at the ready to get the real thing, here’s how to whip up an amazing faux double exposure with ease.

 

1. Choose your photos and open in Photoshop
For your portrait layer, silhouetted images those that are darker in the foreground with a completely solid, blank color in the background tend to work best and will give you the least grief in the editing process. For a texture overlay, flowers, foggy forest trees, clouds, or cityscapes are all great choices.

For your portrait layer, silhouetted images those that are darker in the foreground with a completely solid, blank color in the background tend to work best and will give you the least grief in the editing process. For a texture overlay, flowers, foggy forest trees, clouds, or cityscapes are all great choices.

2. Overlay your images
Place your texture layer over your portrait layer. Select the texture layer and choose the blend mode “screen.” Play with the opacity sliders until you find something that looks appealing to you. At this stage you can also choose whether or not you want to desaturate your images for a chic black and white look or keep those vibrant colors in your image.

3. Adjust contrast

Select whichever layer you wish to start with, then go to image, adjustments, and then play with the levels and curves of your layers in order to find a contrast that you like. This contrast tweaking will also determine the amount of facial features or texture that shines through in your final image.

4. Tweak saturation & placement, sharpen and save

If you chose to keep your texture layer in color, now is the time to play around with your saturation and placement. Sometimes a stray flower or tree branch will hit an awkward area, so a simple command+T will allow you to select this layer and adjust it. Go ahead and find what works best for your particular image (and to keep everything to scale while you move it around, hold down your shift key). Finally, quickly filter sharpening your portrait layer can keep your image from looking muddled. Once you’re satisfied, flatten your image and save – done!


Original Post Here Article written by Lauren Valentine.